Donation Central View Adoptable Dogs Donation Central

Foster Program

Contact Us

A vital part of the rescue process is fostering. A foster parent fulfills an integral role by providing the initial safe and secure environment for a rescued dog. By taking in a newly rescued dog, you enable us to pull another dog in need from the Los Angeles area shelters.

During the transition phase from shelter to home, rescued dogs require emotional support. A foster parent must provide a nurturing atmosphere that includes shelter, exercise, and most importantly, love. It takes a special person who can provide all of this for a rescued dog and then give them up when a permanent home is found.

Foster parents can also contribute immensely in placing rescued dogs in appropriately matched homes. By observing their fostered dog’s specific personality traits, we gather essential information necessary for placing each dog in the right home.

Testimonials About Fostering

Fostering for Karma has been an amazing experience. We get to see our foster dogs true personality come alive as we provide a stable home with discipline and love. Knowing that we play such a vital role in saving his life and ensuring his future is a humbling experience. We love being a foster family for these beautiful dogs!

—J.C.

In the past year and a half my roommate and I have fostered six different dogs. Some were adults and others only a few months old. It's a serious commitment to make but we are extremely grateful for the experiences we've had because of these dogs. A lot of love and hard works goes into caring for another living being, however the rewards are amazing! You get to learn each dog's unique personality, watch them learn, and grow up right before your eyes. It's the best feeling when the dogs get adopted because you know that they have found a forever home, but will always have a place in your heart. Fostering is something that I find extremely rewarding, and I just love helping these little nuggets find their place in the world.

—K.D.

When I decided to become a foster for Karma Rescue, I did so because I know they rely on help from the public to open our doors to their loving rescues that need some TLC! I have always loved dogs and I wanted to save the lives of these homeless pets and help them find their way to loving families. However, in the two-plus years that I have been involved, fostering has become so much more.

One of my greatest joys comes from watching these dogs emerge from being frightened, confused and untrained creatures to being happier, healthier, and more secure dogs again. There is nothing better than watching a shy, reserved dog release his 'inner puppy' and run around the yard at full speed, just for the sheer fun of it! As I've worked with foster dogs, I have been absolutely amazed at what can be accomplished in a relatively short amount of time. The dogs come to us with so much potential! Because of my fostering experience, I have stopped feeling sorry for these dogs and have come to expect nothing but great things from them. If I provide them with leadership, structure, and affection, they will reward me with good behavior, increased confidence and enough tail wags and sloppy kisses to last a lifetime.

As my foster dogs watch me walk away after an adoption, they must wonder why I am leaving them and it breaks my heart; I wish they could know that I will always remember them. However, I need to move on to the next deserving dog, of which there is never a shortage.

—T.K.

Fostering dogs is one of the most challenging and rewarding jobs I've ever undertaken. My specialty is dogs who are anxious or shy. Working with them, folding them into my own pack and seeing them blossom into themselves is more rewarding than I ever thought possible.

Through my years of experience fostering these dogs, they have taught me much more than I have ever taught them. I'm unsure who gets more out of it, me or them!

You might think it very hard to have a dog, teach them what they need to know and then have them get adopted by a new family. On the contrary, I consider myself a bridge from where they were to where they are going. They learn what they need to know to be ready for a new family and then go off to the next adventure with them.

—C.A.

 

Donate Now